Mary H. Eastman, 1818 – 1887

Mary H. Eastman, 1818 – 1887

Born in 1818 in Warrenton Virginia, Mary Eastman grew up like
many in the antebellum south, recognizing the paternalism, and
refinement that the institution of slavery encapsulated. Eastman
took a strong interest in Indian life, beginning her literary
career writing the contemporarily popular, and historically
essential “Dahcotah, Or, Life and Legends of the Sioux Around
Fort Snelling” aswell as a number of other Indian related works.
A knowledgeable southerner, and fervent Christian she like many
others was jarred when the abolitionist, incendiary, work “Uncle
Tom’s Cabin” became the sensation it was she set out to write her
own novel, and in 1852 published her most well regarded, successful,
prominent book “Aunt Phillis’s Cabin; or, Southern Life as It Is.”
Therein defending the truth with regards to southern slavery.
Her work sold 30,000+ copies, making it the most well read of
all the “Anti-Tom novels.”

Her last book being published in 1853, and dying in 1887.
We recognize her astute literary talent, contributing one
of the most valuable pro-slavery works of fiction, and acting
as a contrast of truth to the lies, and misrepresentations
contained in Uncle Tom’s Cabin. We praise, remember, and
wholly endorse reading the works of Mary H. Eastman.
Her book will be linked below.

Aunt Phillis’s Cabin; or, Southern Life as it is
– Mary H. Eastman, 1852

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