Oddities

Interesting Material

Material I find interesting, thought provoking, unique,
or comedic that may or may not have a strong relation to
slavery that I would prefer my audience to be introduced to.

Insurgent Radio – Tom Metzger (Incomplete Archive)

A poem derivative of the 1899 work by Rudyard Kipling
“The White Man’s Burden,” this poem is intended to be
anti-imperialist in its message, however there are a few
sections of the poem I enjoy, they are featured here:

What is the White Man’s Burdern? Excerpts

The opening and closing sections of an American
revolutionary socialist poem I’m quite fond of.

“We shall laugh to scorn your power that now holds the world in awe.
We shall trample on your customs and spit upon your law;
We shall come up from life’s desert to your burdened banquet hall.
We shall turn your wine to wormwood, your honey into gall.”

“We shall laugh to scorn your power that now holds the world in awe.
We shall trample on your customs. we shall spit upon your law;
We shall outrage your temples, we shall blaspheme all your gods-
We shall turn the old world over as the plowman turns the clods!”

Logic of Today – Ragnar Redbeard

My favorite line from Ragnar
Redbeards most famous poem.

“Cain’s knotted club is scepter still–
the “Rights of Man” is fraud:
Christ’s Ethics are for creeping things–
true manhood smiles at “God”.
For Might is Right when empires sink
in storms of steel and flame;

And it is Right when weakling breeds–
are hunted down like game.”

An excellent semi-obscure Confederate song.

The Red, White, and Red – Pro-Confederate Song

“Hooray, hurrah we’re a Nation they dread. Three
cheers for Jeff Davis, and the red, white, and red”

Interesting fact: The slogan of George Fitzhugh was:
“The world is too little governed.”

Interesting fact: The slogan of John H. Van Evrie was:
“The White Republic against the world.”

Might-Right
– George S. Patton, 1917

When man in the dark beginning
The brutish shape set by
He stood alone in the forest,
To conquer or to die.

His only urge was hunger,
Of belly or of lust.
His only Right his hairy Might:
Courage his only trust.

Thus he learned that to fight was noble:
Thus he learned that to shirk was base;
Thus he conquered the creatures one and all,
And founded a warrior race.

He fought with the mammoth and orox,
When the coal fields were forests dark.
He vanquished them not by Justice;
But by brawn and a mighty heart.

But dream for a moment this man of might,
Had been of the Pacifist clay?
And had crooned to the tigers of ethical right,
Or had begged of the wolves fair play.

When the cave man sat in his stinking lair,
With his low browed mate hard by;
Gibbering the while he sank his teeth
In a new killed reindeer’s thigh.

What would he have thought,
could his foggy brain,
Have pictured our hapless day,
When craven souls of dreaming fools
Should habit our human clay.

When cowards born of Fear and Greed
Should preach to kindred slaves;
That Right may stand by its self alone,
And needs not Might to save.

They speak but lies these sexless souls,
Lies born of fear and strife
And nurtured in soft indulgence
They see not War is Life.

They do not dare admit the truth,
Though writ in letters red,
That man shall triumph now as then
By blood, which man has shed.

Dreading the word plain written,
In wrecks of empires lost.
That those who trust to Words, not Force.
As slaves shall pay the cost.

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