Slavery and Its Results Considered from a Religious Standpoint – Uknown, 7/11/1880

Slavery and Its Results Considered from a Religious Standpoint – Uknown, 7/11/1880

Is it not time that northern bishops and others should cease their senseless drivel about the degrading influences of
slavery upon the character of the negro? But for slavery the negroes would be today stupid savages in the jungles
of Africa. It was slavery that brought them here, and that has been the means of christianizing and civilizing millions of
them. It is due to slavery that they are better than the barbarous hoards that were encountered by Stanley and Livingstone.
If previous to their enslavement the American negroes had been civilized christian people, there might be some reason
in this talk about the un-favorable influence of slavery. But in fact, and in the order of a beneficent Providence, the
ignorant and brutal savage of Africa has been immeasurably elevated and blessed by a means which philanthropists
dencunce as “the sum of all villainies.” The hand of God was in it, and, when the mission of slavery was accomplished,
the institution was abolished. As between the heathen in Africa and the freedmen in the United States, the vast superiority
of the latter ought to be evident to the dullest comprehension. Slavery was fastened upon the south against her protest
by English and northern influence, but, like the captivity of Joseph, God meant it for good. Instead of so many naked
savages, it has given four or five millions of tolerably civilized people, multitudes of whom are industrious and well-
behaved christians. By it they were brought in contact with the very best type of Anglo-Saxon character, and with the
purest form of the gospel as preached by the Southern Methodists and others. The negro, thus enlightened and saved
by means of slavery, has reason to be thankful that in this wonderful way he was brought up out of savagery and made
a christian man. Of course our philanthropists are not going to see this plain truth, nor to acknowledge it. Were they to
do so, much of their eloquent and bitter denunciations of slavery would appear to be the nonsense which it really is.
Slavery is a thing of the past, but why not fair-minded men review the matter calmly, and concede that incalculable good
has come out of it for the negro? And why should intelligent men continue to write and speak of it as if the people
enslaved had been originally anything but the most degraded and brutalized people on the face of the earth? The
salvation of the African continent is likely to grow out of American slavery. God, who sees the end from tie beginning,
had a great and benevolent purpose and in time that purpose will be made more and more clear. With all the evils
connected with slavery, it is evident that the good greatly exceeded, and that the people enslaved were the chief
beneficiaries. The English and Yankee slave-traders, we may well believe, had no humane object in view, but we
cannot now shut our eyes to the fact that good to the negro and to Africa has come out of their sordid traffic.

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